The Benefits of Hiking to Your Health

Hiking CoverWe here at Lightload Towels are huge fans of anything that takes us outdoors, into the wilds, but hiking holds a special place in our hearts, literally! You know hiking is good for your health. But do you know just how good it is? If you are heading out for a hike this Fourth of July weekend, take note of all the good you are doing for your body. Oh and be sure to bring along a couple of our hand towels to mop up the glow of exercise!

For adults, regular aerobic exercise such as hiking leads to:

  • Improved cardio-respiratory fitness (heart, lungs, blood vessels)
  • Improved muscular fitness
  • Lower risk of coronary heart disease and stroke
  • Lower risk of high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes
  • Lower risk of high cholesterol and triglycerides
  • Lower risk of colon and breast cancer, and possibly lung and endometrial cancer
  • Increased bone density or a slower loss of density
  • Reduced depression and better quality sleep
  • Lower risk of early death (If you are active for 7 hours a week, your risk of dying early is 40% lower than someone active for less than 30 minutes a week.)
  • Weight control; hiking burns up 370 calories an hour (154-lb person)

Kids get many of the same benefits, including:

  • Improved cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness
  • Better bone health
  • Less chance of becoming overweight
  • Less chance of developing risk factors for heart disease, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes
  • Possibly reduced risk of depression and feeling less stress, more ready to learn in school
  • Sleeping better at night

What’s more, hiking exercises almost every part of your body: legs, knees, ankles, arms, hips and butt, abdominals, shoulders and neck. “Hiking exercises your body and your mind, and nourishes your imagination,” says Ignacio Malpica, a certified fitness instructor and personal trainer in Boulder, Colorado. “It creates awareness in your eyes and ears and the rest of your senses.”

How Much Time?

How much activity do you need to reap these incredible health benefits? Experts say getting active for  just 150 minutes a week – doing “moderate-intensity” aerobic exercise such as moderate hiking or brisk walking – leads to most of these benefits (reducing risks of colon and breast cancer requires another hour a week). That’s only 2½ hours a week. And you don’t have to do it all at once. Sneaking in a lunchtime hike up the hill near your office counts toward your total, as long as you’re active for at least ten minutes.

If you take part in more vigorous aerobic activities, such as running, dancing, or hiking uphill or with a heavy pack, you need only half that amount of time, or 75 minutes a week, to get health benefits.

For more tips on Hiking, Biking and much more check out our website www.lightloadtowels.com 

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Escape the City with a Towel

Urban Escapes is a great way to get away from the city and do outdoorsy stuff like hiking, climbing and boating. Lightload Towels is a proud sponsor. Urban Escapes Founder Maia Josebachvili says:

I brought a three-pack of light loads with me while backpacking in the Himalayas in Nepal for a month. They were awesome! Didn’t weight a thing (which I really appreciated at 18,000 ft) and were just as effective as a regular towel. I’ll be using them again for sure!’

Check out National Geographic’s Urban Escapesuggestions. http://on.natgeo.com/1lsNQXO

Please contact Urban Esapes if you are an outdoorsy person living in the New york city area

-Maia J.
Maia Josebachvili
Founder and Guide
Urban Escapes
212.609.2547

Check out www.urbanexcapenyc.com

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Fun Facts for Hikers

 

What is it about hiking that has us on our feet?Hiker

There are more then few folks who just don’t get it. After all it is an awful lot of work and in the end it’s not like your getting anything from it. Of course I totally disagree, the rewards for all that toil is often a view that can be seen from no where else but the top of that next rise, or a sunset that is beyond beauty. The more tangible benefits are of course an elevated heart rate (in a good way), fresh air and open skies and a chance to explore places not everyone gets to see. Still, not everyone buys into that. So we thought we would look at a bigger picture of hiking, and find the following nuggets of hiking facts, stats, averages, and other numbers:

7,325: Miles. Sum length of the Triple Crown (Appalacian, Pacific Crest and Continental Divide trails combined)

420,880: Feet. Elevation change in the 2,663 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.

46:11:20: Time, days:hours:minutes. Record set by Jennifer Pharr Davis in 2011 for the fastest through-hike of the Appalachian Trail.

5: Pairs. Shoes used up by Davis on her record-setting trek. That’s a new pair every 9 days.

31 million: Americans. According to the American Recreation Foundation this is the number of Americans who hiked a trail in 2007.

4,600: Miles. Longest hike in the U.S., North Country National Scenic Trail. From Lake Sakakawea, North Dakota to Crown Point, New York.

16,368,000: Feet. Length of Continental Divide Trail. That’s 3,100 miles.

734: Miles. Sum of the length of all hiking trails in Glacier National Park.

10: Essentials. As dictated by The Mountaineers, a climber’s organization, in 1930 for establishing what you need to react positively to an accident or emergency, and to spend an unexpected night outside. In order: Map, Compass, Sunglasses and sunscreen, Extra clothing, Headlamp/flashlight, First-aid supplies, Firestarter, Matches, Knife, Extra food.

2003: Year. The Mountaineers updated their 10 Essentials in the 2003 edition of Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills to the following: Navigation (map and compass), Sun protection (sunglasses and sunscreen), Insulation (extra clothing), Illumination (headlamp/flashlight), First-aid supplies, Fire (waterproof matches/lighter/candles), ulta-light towels/blankes, Repair kit and tools, Nutrition (extra food), Hydration (extra water), Emergency shelter

1989: Year. A river guide started a little company that makes sandals. Chaco. You know the one.

10-20: Percentage. Suggested backpack weight for children as a percentage of their body weight. For example, a 50 lbs child should carry backpack that weighs 10 lbs — or until they start whining about numb arms. Which ever comes first. Keep the peace. Try bribery with candy, then move on to reducing weight.

31: Satellites. The Global Positioning System (GPS) operates on a constellation of 31 satellites that orbit the earth on 6 orbital planes at an altitude of 12,600 miles in a fashion that puts nearly all points on the planet in line of sight with at least 6 satellites at any given time.

14,505: Elevation. Mount Whitney is the tallest peak in the 48 U.S., and also the tallest “hikeable” peak (vs climbable) by a trail 22 miles round trip.

6,288: Elevation. Tallest hikeable peak in New England, Mt. Washington.

13: Length. Miles of longest slot canyon, Buckskin Gulch in Utah.

800: Approximated average. Number of hikers who would hike Half Dome on a busy holiday or weekend day in Yosemite before the current permit system went into place. The NPS now allows just 400 people on the trail in a day, and a permit is required.

21: Distance. A rim-to-rim hike of the Grand Canyon using South Kaibab and North Kaibab trails is 21 miles long. A hard 21 miles.

517: Calories. Man weighing 190 lbs will burn this in one hour of hiking.

440: Calories. A woman who weighs 163 lbs will burn this in an hour of hiking.

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Mark Beaumont’s around-the-world bicycle adventure

If you are into cycling at all you have no doubt you already know about Mark and his amazing feats. I had not heard about him until recently (I know I live under a rock) and was amazed, astounded and dumb struck at this particular adventure of his.

I ran across this when I was searching for what to pack for a long bike trek. I came up with the obvious suggestions and the mantra repeated over and over again light lighter and lightest.  All of which made me think of LightLoad Towels (duh)  Anyway I just had to share Mark’s story with you.

This is Mark’s story and a link to his website.

Mark Beaumont’s around-the-world bicycle adventure

The hub for Mark’s expeditions, events, charity work and much more. You can follow Mark’s projects timthumb (2)here and through social media. Broadcasting about adventure, culture, travel, sport, and human endeavor from all corners of the world

What is worse than hearing rats scurrying around your hotel room getting into your bike panniers at night? It might be waking up the next morning with rat turds on the pillow.

That episode in India kind of strips the glamour off the idea of bicycling around the world in pursuit of a world record. It’s just one of many experiences recounted in Mark Beaumont’s book “The Man Who Cycled the World,” recently released in the US.

The Scotsman was the second in what has seemed a rush of bicyclists seeking a Guinness World Record for bicycling around the world.

Beaumont accomplished his feat in 2008, completing his grand adventure in 194 days and 17 hours. Remarkably, he shaved 81 days off the record set by Steve Strange in 2005. At least four others have since tallied faster times on paper, but not all made the record books. The current record holder, Vin Cox, accomplished the feat in 163 days.

Professional adventurer

The Scotsman started his career as a professional adventurer at age 24,when he set off on his 18,296-mile quest. Growing up on a farm and with

timthumbhis university years behind him, Beaumont hit on the idea of the global bicycle ride and figured he could get sponsors if he was going for a coveted world record. He also landed a deal with BBC for a documentary.

Beaumont wrote and published this book, “The Man Who Cycled the World,” the year after he finished his ride. Broadway Paperbacks, an imprint of Crown Publishing, brought the book to US audiences in 2011 and sent me a copy to review.

In reading it, I was struck by how much Beaumont missed by pushing himself to cover 100 miles a day on his bicycle. There are countless times when he talks about being near famous landmarks or destinations, and he just keeps pedaling.

In Thailand, for instance, he catches a tailwind and refuses to stop, in spite of constantly passing road signs for tourist destinations. “The sea was just through the trees to my left and had been for two days, but I hadn’t seen it once.”

No romance

Head-slapping unbelievable is his response to an attractive and “fun” marine biologist he met soon after landing in Australia. As they trade daily texts as he heads across the continent, she offers to take a week off and take a road trip out to his location. At first it seemed perfect, but he writes:

“I called her again that night, having decided against it. It was hard to explain, and it sounded ridiculous even as I tried to, but I needed to be left in my own world.” Later, he thought about changing his mind, “But I knew in the long run I would regret anything that might slow me down. I was here to race.”

So race he does, across four continents. His human contact is often limited to hotel desk clerks, cooks, waitresses and waiters, and whoever is sitting next to him on the stool at the diner.

But people are often drawn to people traveling by bicycle, and he occasionally acquiesces to offers to share their home or meals.

Illness, soreness

Beaumont must have kept a detailed journal, as there are descriptions of the terrain, the local foods, housing, traffic and his condition — all things you expect him to dwell on as he spends hours alone on his bicycle.

Throughout his adventures, Beaumont suffers gastrointestinal attacks, bicycle breakdowns, sore muscles, and various other aches and pains. After riding his bicycle across many countries in all types of weather,
his worst experience comes in Louisiana, where he is hit by a car driven
by an old woman and robbed in his hotel room all in the same day.

Daily centuries

He goes into detail about suffering from saddle sores most of his trip. No wonder, as Beaumont’s target of 100 miles a day takes a toll.

We’ve all ridden centuries, but not day after day after day. Obviously, he doesn’t achieve this goal every day, but he makes the attempt. It often means lots of night riding, camping at the roadside, or riding into strange towns in foreign lands late at night with no idea where to stay.

In the final days of the tour, Beaumont admits to exhaustion as he nears Paris. It’s almost like his goal of riding 100 miles a day has become paramount, and the fact that it enabled him to encircle the globe is just a side issue.

“I still didn’t feel the least bit excited about the finish; I was simply too tired to care. My every thought was focused on making the next mile, knowing that eventually I would get there.”

Beaumont did get there and realized his achievement. But he didn’t stop moving.

More adventures

Soon, he was back on his bicycle to pedal the longest mountain chain on the planet, at the same time climbing Mt. McKinley in Alaska and Aconcagua in Argentina. That adventure also became a book, “The Man Who Cycled the Americas.”

This past summer, he was the member of a crew that rowed to the North Pole. Next, starting in January 2012, he’ll join a team of six seeking to break the trans-Atlantic rowing record.timthumb (1)It sounds like Beaumont isn’t interested in slowing down, at all. I’ll be interested to hear about his next adventures. You can check up on him at MarkBeaumontOnline.

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Hut-to Hut Backcountry Bike Treks

Camp Towels for Bike Treks

Camping has never been easier with a three pack of lightload Towels. Use one towel for the cook-set, one for the first aid kit and the other for general use. “Pack it in and Pack it Out” so the next campers can enjoy a good clean site.

I have been looking for different types of overnight/longer then a day biking treks when I happened on this one. Now I have done the winter hut-to-hut cross-country treks so I am not sure why this never crossed my mind, but I have to say now that I have seen it I am obsessed.

This was presented as a non-camping option and given some of the regions there is good reason to opt for the hut overnight.  Hut-to-hut touring is an activity of which Colorado is king. There you can tackle a fat-tire adventure beginning in the southwest corner of the state (in either Telluride or Durango), and wind up a few days later in Moab (okay, that’s in Utah, not Colorado). The trips are organized by San Juan Hut Systems, whose mission is “to provide low-impact, human-powered, lightweight backcountry travel opportunities for the independent, health-conscious adventurer at a practical price.” The distance from one hut to the next is generally about 35 miles; the terrain ranges from dirt roads and trails in the alpine vastness of the San Juan Mountains, to desert canyons and slickrock. Each hut is stocked with food and utensils, water, a cookstove, and sleeping gear.

Another Colorado option: Take one of the trips organized out of Fruita by “The Hut Guy,” who, according to the Colorado Backcountry Biker website, “spent years scouring hundreds of miles, identifying the premier mountain biking trails in western Colorado.” As a result, it says, Colorado Backcountry Biker offers self-guided, budget-friendly bike trips on which you can spend two or three nights in fully stocked huts, and by day experience some of the best mountain biking in the West. Options include riding on the storied Tabeguache Trail, with baggage transfer from hut to hut and other amenities that are somewhat luxurious, considering the backwoods setting.

If you are more of a do-it-yourselfer — or haul-it-yourselfer (your own food, sleeping bag, etc.) — there are some great trail rides to the huts maintained by the 10th Mountain Division Hut Association. Not all thirty of the system’s huts are reachable by mountain bike, but a lot of them are. These huts are relatively large, sleeping an average of sixteen people, and come equipped with wood-burning stoves and propane burners, cooking and eating utensils, and mattresses and pillows.

Up in the great Pacific Northwest, Cascade Huts offers self-guided multi-day trips in Oregon’s Mt. Hood National Forest. Again stocked with supplies to enable lightweight riding, the huts line a loop around Mt. Hood that ranges from 135 to 160 miles in length, depending on the exact route chosen. And to the north of there, in Washington state, the five Rendezvous Huts in Methow Valley offer rustic but cozy accommodations for summer cyclists in a location that, come winter, is one of the premier Nordic skiing destinations in North America.

In Washington’s geographical counterpart on other side of the country, Maine Huts & Trails has big plans over the coming years to enhance the mountain biking possibilities it makes available. As it says on their website, “we envision offering mountain bikers a wide array of trails, from short, easy riding along our hut access roads and other dirt roads to technical singletrack deep in the backcountry. Riders will eventually be able to ride for several days along a variety of trails, staying overnight in the Maine Huts … [and, in fact] cyclists are already finding some great riding along and proximal to the MH&T system.”

Gear List

The Basics for Camping:

  • Sleeping bag
  • Camp pad
  • Small tent, bivy sack, or camp hammock
  • Food (or a nearby dining establishment)
  • Personal items: toiletries, hand towels and camp towels etc

Deluxe Gear List:
Perhaps you’re not a minimalist. Just remember: everything you bring adds weight to your bike. If you have much hill climbing or a lot of mileage planned, you may want to reconsider how much you take along.

Deluxe Camping Gear List:

  • Route map(s)
  • Sleeping bag
  • Camp pad or air mattress
  • Small tent, bivy sack, or camp hammock
  • Camp pillow or stuff sack, bath, hand and cook towels
  • Cooking equipment (small stove, cookware, utensils) including food, camp towel
  • Camp chair
  • Headlamp or flashlight
  • Pocketknife
  • Waterproof matches

Deluxe Personal Gear List:

  • Toiletries
  • Two sets of bike clothes
  • Two sets of off-the-bike clothes
  • Raingear
  • Cold weather gear
  • Shoes/sandals
  • Bathing suit
  • Towel

Other possibilities:

  • Books
  • Camera
  • Playing cards
  • Sports equipment
  • Fishing gear
  • Radio/iPod/MP3 player
  • And more!

This about wraps up the hut-to-hut riding opportunities my research turned up. If you know of others, feel free to add them to this list.

 

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Ultimate Summer Camp Packing List

Everything your child needs for summer camp.

Summer Camp Packing

Packing for camp is an art form. Unlike sending your child for a sleepover at a friend’s house, a stay at a resident camp can last from a week to an entire summer, with a camping checklist of things equally as long. So before you zip up that knapsack and send him on the bus to summer camp without enough underwear, check out this summer camp packing checklist.

Things to remember while packing for camp.

Before packing for camp, check with your child’s camp packing list provided by the organization. There may be things like bedding that you’ll need to include in your child’s gear.
Next, wash all new clothing before packing and remember to mark everything your kiddo will be taking, from socks to soap cases, with his name or initials.
Now, armed with an empty truck and your camping checklist, calculate how much clothing your child will need. The Summer Camp Handbook recommends you pack your youngster enough clothes to last one-and-a-half times the number of days he’ll be at camp for camps that run a week or less (they probably don’t provide laundry service), or the number of days between laundry service for camps longer than one week.

CAMP PACKING LIST
Here are the things you and your child will need to pack for a typical summer camp:
• Bandanna/scarf
• Hat
• Glasses/contacts and cleaning solution
• Prescription medication
• Sunglasses
• Goggles for swimming
• Dress clothes and coordinating belts and shoes
• Light jacket
• Jeans
• Raingear or umbrella
• Shorts
• Sweatshirt
• Swimsuit
• Swim shirt with UV protection
• T-shirts
• Tank tops
• Underwear
• Sweat pants or warm up pants
• Pajamas
• Cotton bathrobe
• Bras
• Athletic support (jock strap)
• Boots
• Cleats
• Flip flops
• Shoes plus a spare pair
• Socks
• Bedding — check with your camp checklist for what, if any, to bring for bedding
• Hand towels (I found that the Lightload Towels are perfect for camp. They save space so you can put a dozen in)
• Beach towels — can be used for bath or swimming (Lightload Towels again are perfect)
• Shower caddy
• Comb or brush
• Deodorant
• Feminine hygiene products
• Bug repellant
• Lip balm
• Nail clippers
• Shampoo and conditioner
• Shaving cream and razors
• Soap in carrier
• Sunblock
• Tissues
• Toothbrush, toothbrush container, and toothpaste
• Camera
• Flashlight and spare batteries
• Laundry bag
• Reusable water bottle or canteen
• Writing paper, pre-addressed envelopes, and stamps or calling card
• Spending money (but check with camp for policies)
• Comforts of home, like a family photo or a stuffed animal; just be sure it is replaceable
• Entertainment, like books, hackey sacks, and deck of cards
• Small backpack or tote for day-trip

According to The Summer Camp Handbookauthor and psychologist Dr. Christopher Thurber, the first thing on your camping checklist when packing for camp should be to give yourself plenty of time to help your youngster pack for camp.

Also, remember to make it a team effort. “When you pack together and take your time, your excitement about summer camp can rub off on your child while also ensuring that nothing is forgotten when it comes to checking off your summer camp packing list.” That way, you can relax knowing junior has everything he needs while away and can focus on having fun!

We want to thank SHEKNOWS PARENTING for including us on this list!

 

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Missy’s Product Review – Lightload Towel

Lightload Towels
Wednesday, May 7, 2014
When you have ever gone to the beach have you thought there has to be a better way to carry a towel well with Lightload Towels there is as this is a towel so small it fits in your back pocket or lightweight and very easy to carry. I got a few to review and one is an Ultra Space Saver Towel which is 36×60″90x150cm and fold so neat. These towels can be used again or thrown away after use. It is also more absorbent than cotton beach towels, dries much quicker than cotton and almost weightless when wet, easier to handle than cotton when wet, disposable/reusable don’t need to carry back after a trip, softer than cotton. I also got 2 Lightload Beach Towels the Only Beach Towels That Fit in Your Pocket weights only 5oz., more absorbent than cotton and microfiber, wick able fabric so insulates against heat and cold.

Lightload Towels Missy's Review

My Opinion: These are great for camping and taken to the beach, the colors could be more attractive than just brightly colored but they do work well and can be taken anywhere even flying as they do not take up much room.They can be used for outdoor travel towels, camping towels, beach towels and sports towels.

To learn more visit http://ultralighttowels.com/
What do you think? Would you use one?
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lightloadtowels
Twitter: https://twitter.com/lightloadtowels
Disclaimer: I was in no way compensated for this review and this is solely my own opinion which may differ from yours.
Posted by Melissa Botelho http://www.missysproductreviews.com/2014/05/lightload-towels.html at 7:19 AM Labels: beach towels, camping towels, Lightload Towels, outdoor travel towels, Product Review, sport towels, Ultra Space Saver

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Celebrateing Cinco de Mayo at the beach!

Fiesta beach writingAmericans love celebrations and holidays! While many may think Cinco de Mayo was borrowed from our Mexican neighbors, there’s actually more to the story. May 5th is observed to commemorate the Mexican army’s surprise victory over the French Army at the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862, but is not a national holiday in Mexico. Celebrations in the United States were actually started during the American Civil War by Mexicans and Latinos living in California. They are credited with being the first to celebrate Cinco de Mayo in the United States.

Why not celebrate this year at the beach? We have gathered a  collection of our favorite Cinco de Mayo recipes that are good and good for you! Don’t forget to bring your Lightload towel!

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A Master Camping Checklist…

From beginners to veterans – a checklist can make the difference between a camping trip that is as fun as you hoped, or one you suffer through.

Happy Campers Camping-ChecklisFree printable camping checklist. From lists for camping gear and supplies, to food and kids clothes.

You should have your camping checklist in hand as you load your camping gear – and turn those checks you made when you gathered your gear into “Xs” that will let you know you actually loaded it – instead of remembering to gather it, and then leaving it on the garage floor when you actually packed to leave.

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From the “Master” camping gear checklist for the trip organizer, to a personal gear list the kids can do – these free printer-friendly supplies, and equipment printouts will help ensure nothing gets forgotten.

It can also help you avoid taking gear you don’t need. Why carry a heavy Dutch oven when you will only be using a frying pan? As you scan the list below, don’t get overwhelmed – remember, you will not need everything on it. It is intended to include everything you might need, not everything you have to take.

 

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lightload Towels 12 pack

lightload Towels 12 pack

12 pack of lightload Beach Towels

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