lightload Towels 12 pack

lightload Towels 12 pack

12 pack of lightload Beach Towels

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lightoad Towels creative photo

lightoad Towels creative photo

If you are lost, survival is just around the corner with Lightload Towels

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http://issuu.com/theatlanticcurrent/docs/tac_issue_9_final/1?e=8149732/6722354#/signin

Check out the lightload Towels gear review. on page 12-13

 

Dustin Wright

Publisher/Editor

561-383-0035

theatlanticcurrent.com

/TheAtlanticCurrent

@AtlanticCurrent

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Testing out the (Ultra)) Lightload Towels by Glamorous Traveller

Liyanatraveller from Glamorous Traveller an extremely popular blogging site reviewed the Lightload Towels and has given them an awesome thumbs up. Please read her review below. 

Waaaaayyyyy back in the beginning of my blog, I reviewed a few different travel towels. It’s since then gone way way up on my list of top blog posts and hopefully provided some insight to you too. Of course there are a bunch more travel towels out there that I didn’t review. I even received an email from ultralighttowels.com founder George, sharing how I had forgotten to review one of “the most unique and absorbent travel towel on the market; the Lightload towels.” So after some back and forth via email, I received my Lightload Towel for review and packed it up with me on my trip to Myanmar.

 

Packing Light

photo-018(Really small travel towels – in various sizes)

Without a doubt, this was the smallest travel towel I’ve brought on a trip. EVER. The full size travel towel comes condensed in a small circle, the size of a hockey pick and smaller than a paperback. If you’re thinking of bringing one with you, I do recommend that you don’t open it up at home but instead bring it with you still vacuum sealed and only open it up when you’re at your destination. The tiny packing of course meant that I could bring a bunch of extra things with me (but I don’t! because I’m supposed to be all about efficient packing too!). But if you did feel the urge to bring that extra top, this travel towel will definitely help.

It’s Uses

Once at destination, they’re really easy to use. You can of course just open it up and flap it in the air a few times to open it up. Or alternatively if you don’t feel like peeling it open, just soak it in some water to help it absorb and loosen up. Set it to dry and then you can use it as per normal.

IMG_8890-001(Add in some water and poof! Full size travel towel!)

What I really liked about the lightload towels are the different things you could use it for. They have all of it written up on their website, but I still found it funny to see their survival video on how you could use it. That’s right folks, apart from a travel towel, you could use it as a beach towel, a wind scarf, for first aid, or best of all as kindling in case you need to build a fire. “But what are you going to use to wipe yourself if you burnt your towel?” you may ask? Well, actually that’s also why its so cool the lightload towels come in so many different sizes. Bring it with you for a month or two, finish up in the forest and build yourself a fire using one of your towels. Then poof! Open up another pack of towel that you easily tucked into your pocket and you’re all set to continue on your journey.

Absorbency

Of course being a travel towel, one of the things you think about is, will this feel like a towel? Would it work like a towel? It may seem fragile in your hand, but you can easily use this to rub-a-dub-dub your back easily. It absorbs as well as a normal towel, but of course as it’s a travel towel you won’t get the homey fluffy feeling a normal towel would give you. As a basic though, it does its job well in terms of absorbing moisture.

IMG_8889-001

Fast drying

Another important element of a travel towel is how fast would it dry? I found that if you were to use it for a night shower you will wake up the next day to find it nice and dry. I can’t tell you for sure how many hours it takes to dry up from being fully wet (I’m not THAT scientific about my road testing), but I can assure you if you used the towel and then dried it out in the sun, I’m pretty sure it’ll be dry within an hour or so (depending as well on how strong your sunshine is)

 

The Cons

This is a single product review, so to be fair, I should share my areas of concern with this as well. I really didn’t see a lot of problems with the towel. The only thing that people may worry about is how fragile the towel can be.

It is quite thin, and unlikely that you’re going to be able to re-use this again and again and again. That being said though, if you take care of it, it’ll probably last you throughout your 2 months backpacking trip through Europe. I tried to rip it apart myself and it actually didn’t rip which made me feel its durable enough for multiple uses. I even chucked it into the washing machine and dryer to see how it would hold up and it was fine.

photo-17 copy(Packing small in comparison to everything else I brought with me)

Overall verdict

Overall I do think it is a good travel towel and handy for you to have and pack given its extremely small size and lightness. It absorbs just as well as a regular towel but its thin material also makes sure it dries up quickly. It’s main purpose is to be a towel and it does well in serving that, but don’t expect to use it for other things you would typically want towels to do, like act as a thick insulating blanket, or a comfy padded pillow. Also, don’t expect this to be a towel you keep on for a year or so, but take care of it enough and you can easily bring it with you for a few weeks or months on the road. And when all said and done? Well, why not go camping and use it up as kindling!

Lightload Towels can be found at Ultralighttowels.com in hand towel and beach towel sizes. They’re also sold in packs of two, threes, twelves and fifties for those who want to keep one at hand always.

*** I received a few lightload towels to be used for review and giveaway. 

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Posted in beach towels, kayaking, Lightload Towels, outdoor sports, towels, travel, travel accessories | Tagged , | Leave a comment

I loved the light load towels – they were a big hit.

I loved the light load towels – they were a big hit.

Here’s my blog post review on them.

http://snugharborbay.blogspot.com/2012/02/lightload-towels-gear-review.html

If you’d like me to review any of your other towels, please let me know.   If you’d like to supply me with a few of the small ones I could do a give away on my blog.

Thanks again,

kim

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Lightload Travel Towels Comparisons for Outdoor, Camping and Backpack Gear

Easily packable lightload Towels

Susan Hamilton the award winning travel writer did a comparison of three towels used for travel. Here is what she had to say about lightload Towels.

Lightload Towels

“This super compact 12-inch by 20-inch towel comes vacuum sealed in a package that is smaller than palm size. Lightload towels are wickable and should be hand washed. Because these towels are made of viscose, they are more absorbent than microfiber or cotton.

Lightload towels can provide insulation in extreme weather, as well as being used as a fire starter or coffee filter. Backpackers use Lightload towels in place of bandanas and camp towels. Athletes use them for drying off as well as cleaning their gear.”

Susan also went on to describe what a travel towel is. She writes, “

Compact and thin, travel towels are a practical way to take towels on vacations, camping trips and international destinations. Much less bulky than regular terrycloth or cotton towels, travel towels are made of synthetic materials that dry quickly.

Many travel towels are made of microfiber. These towels are soft but the microfiber can sometimes irritate sensitive skin. Some travel towels are made of viscose rayon, nylon or polyester. Some travel towel fabrics are infused with antibacterial fibers that prevent bacterial growth.

She goes on to write, “

Travel towels allow campers, backpackers, travelers and athletes to have the convenience of a towel without the added weight. When packing for yurt camping (such as destinations in Oregon, Washington and Idaho), travel towels keep the load light. Their compact size is ideal for saving space in luggage and packs. Super absorbent and quick drying, travel towels have a multitude of uses — from blankets to fire starters.”

Susan Lynne Hamilton is an award-winning writer, specializing in travel, recreation, wine, food and health. As the Feature Writer for Suite 101’s Northwest U.S. travel section, she showcases the rich features this unique region of America offers.

Read more at Suite101: Travel Towels Comparisons for Outdoor, Camping and Backpack Gear http://nwusalaskatravel.suite101.com/article.cfm/travel-towels-comparisons-for-outdoor-camping-and-backpack-gear#ixzz0rxG93HPW

Posted in hiking products, Lightload Towels, packing light, towels, travel, travel accessories | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Happy Towel Day!

Lightload Towels on Towel DayToday May 25, is Towel Day all over the world and is a special tribute to Douglas Adams the author of the Hitchiker Guide to the Galaxy. This tradition started soon after Douglas Adams sudden Death on may 11.2001 and has continued since. Please go to towelday.org for more information.

“ A towel, it says, is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have. Partly it has great practical value. You can wrap it around you for warmth as you bound across the cold moons of Jaglan Beta; you can lie on it on the brilliant marble-sanded beaches of Santraginus V, inhaling the heady sea vapors; you can sleep under it beneath the stars which shine so redly on the desert world of Kakrafoon; use it to sail a miniraft down the slow heavy River Moth; wet it for use in hand-to-hand-combat; wrap it round your head to ward off noxious fumes or avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (such a mind-bogglingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can’t see it, it can’t see you); you can wave your towel in emergencies as a distress signal, and of course dry yourself off with it if it still seems to be clean enough.
More importantly, a towel has immense psychological value. For some reason, if a strag (strag: non-hitch hiker) discovers that a hitch hiker has his towel with him, he will automatically assume that he is also in possession of a toothbrush, face flannel, soap, tin of biscuits, flask, compass, map, ball of string, gnat spray, wet weather gear, space suit etc., etc. Furthermore, the strag will then happily lend the hitch hiker any of these or a dozen other items that the hitch hiker might accidentally have “lost”. What the strag will think is that any man who can hitch the length and breadth of the galaxy, rough it, slum it, struggle against terrible odds, win through, and still knows where his towel is is clearly a man to be reckoned with.

— Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

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