Category Archives: first aid kits

Love everything about the outdoors except wasps?

Wasps can be a problem in your home; sometimes they can even sting and cause lots of pain and discomfort! Your yard imagescan be a “dangerous” place for you to relax. Sometimes wasp can even lead to great injuries in case you are allergic to their stings.

To try and keep the wasps off your home there are many ways which you can employ for you to get rid of them. The best way for you to go about it after you discover your home has been affected by the wasps is to look for natural ways that will help you to get rid of wasps.

This is due to several reasons, for instance, after you decide to make use of natural ways you will save your money in trying to keep the wasps off as well as avoiding any health complications in your home. The following are natural ways that you can use to get rid of wasps:

1.Use Soap Sprays

This is a method that you can easily apply in your home after you notice wasps are increasing in population. First, you need to identify the nests and prepare a solution of soap and other detergents that you use in your home.

With the help of a garden hose you can spray the nest with the solution. This will kill the wasps naturally hence making you get rid of them easily.

While spraying them you should be careful not to be stung by standing in a strategic position where they will not notice you easily.

2. Avoid Substances That Attract Wasps in Your Home

There are substances such as foods rich in sugar which wasps like a lot. After you make an effort and avoid throwing those foods in your home you will reduce attracting wasps to your home. Other foods that attract them include meat and pet foods. In case there are left overs of such foods in your home you should try and keep them in a bag that is sealed well to avoid cases where wasps may end up being attracted to your home.

3. Grow Plants That Deter Wasps

Plants such as wormwood, eucalyptus, mint and citronella are natural wasp deterrents. If possible you should grow those plants in your garden where they will deter away the wasps. Apart from the plants chasing away the wasps naturally they will also add beauty to your garden.

4. Put up Fake Nests

Wasps are known to be very territorial. After you but up a fake nest in your home you will reduce chances of wasps putting up nests in your home because they will think another colony is already established there. There are several materials in your home which you can use and come up with a fake wasp nest or buy a new one.

5. Block-off Underground Nests

Sometimes wasps can build an underground nest in your home. You can easily get rid of wasps in a natural way by blocking all the entrances of the wasps. When blocking the entrances and exits you need to ensure you block all of them so that you will deny the wasps access to food which will make them die over some time.

To ensure you block the entrances and exits completely you can decide to use a cover and add grease to make it a tight seal.

6. Hang a Sandwich Filled With Water

You can easily keep the wasps out of your house by hanging a sandwich filled with water. This will make the wasps think there is a spider web on your door which can trap them.

This is a simple trick that you can use to keep wasps out of your home easily. The sandwich is very easy for you to design and it will lead you to getting rid of wasps easily without killing them where they will migrate to other places away from your home.

7. Traps

For you to reduce the population of wasps in your home you can decide to come up with glass wasp traps which you can use and trap wasps in your home. When making use of the traps you need to use attractive baits which will enable you attract a lot of wasps so that you can reduce their population and even get rid of them completely

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Fun Facts for Hikers

 

What is it about hiking that has us on our feet?Hiker

There are more then few folks who just don’t get it. After all it is an awful lot of work and in the end it’s not like your getting anything from it. Of course I totally disagree, the rewards for all that toil is often a view that can be seen from no where else but the top of that next rise, or a sunset that is beyond beauty. The more tangible benefits are of course an elevated heart rate (in a good way), fresh air and open skies and a chance to explore places not everyone gets to see. Still, not everyone buys into that. So we thought we would look at a bigger picture of hiking, and find the following nuggets of hiking facts, stats, averages, and other numbers:

7,325: Miles. Sum length of the Triple Crown (Appalacian, Pacific Crest and Continental Divide trails combined)

420,880: Feet. Elevation change in the 2,663 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.

46:11:20: Time, days:hours:minutes. Record set by Jennifer Pharr Davis in 2011 for the fastest through-hike of the Appalachian Trail.

5: Pairs. Shoes used up by Davis on her record-setting trek. That’s a new pair every 9 days.

31 million: Americans. According to the American Recreation Foundation this is the number of Americans who hiked a trail in 2007.

4,600: Miles. Longest hike in the U.S., North Country National Scenic Trail. From Lake Sakakawea, North Dakota to Crown Point, New York.

16,368,000: Feet. Length of Continental Divide Trail. That’s 3,100 miles.

734: Miles. Sum of the length of all hiking trails in Glacier National Park.

10: Essentials. As dictated by The Mountaineers, a climber’s organization, in 1930 for establishing what you need to react positively to an accident or emergency, and to spend an unexpected night outside. In order: Map, Compass, Sunglasses and sunscreen, Extra clothing, Headlamp/flashlight, First-aid supplies, Firestarter, Matches, Knife, Extra food.

2003: Year. The Mountaineers updated their 10 Essentials in the 2003 edition of Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills to the following: Navigation (map and compass), Sun protection (sunglasses and sunscreen), Insulation (extra clothing), Illumination (headlamp/flashlight), First-aid supplies, Fire (waterproof matches/lighter/candles), ulta-light towels/blankes, Repair kit and tools, Nutrition (extra food), Hydration (extra water), Emergency shelter

1989: Year. A river guide started a little company that makes sandals. Chaco. You know the one.

10-20: Percentage. Suggested backpack weight for children as a percentage of their body weight. For example, a 50 lbs child should carry backpack that weighs 10 lbs — or until they start whining about numb arms. Which ever comes first. Keep the peace. Try bribery with candy, then move on to reducing weight.

31: Satellites. The Global Positioning System (GPS) operates on a constellation of 31 satellites that orbit the earth on 6 orbital planes at an altitude of 12,600 miles in a fashion that puts nearly all points on the planet in line of sight with at least 6 satellites at any given time.

14,505: Elevation. Mount Whitney is the tallest peak in the 48 U.S., and also the tallest “hikeable” peak (vs climbable) by a trail 22 miles round trip.

6,288: Elevation. Tallest hikeable peak in New England, Mt. Washington.

13: Length. Miles of longest slot canyon, Buckskin Gulch in Utah.

800: Approximated average. Number of hikers who would hike Half Dome on a busy holiday or weekend day in Yosemite before the current permit system went into place. The NPS now allows just 400 people on the trail in a day, and a permit is required.

21: Distance. A rim-to-rim hike of the Grand Canyon using South Kaibab and North Kaibab trails is 21 miles long. A hard 21 miles.

517: Calories. Man weighing 190 lbs will burn this in one hour of hiking.

440: Calories. A woman who weighs 163 lbs will burn this in an hour of hiking.

Mark Beaumont’s around-the-world bicycle adventure

If you are into cycling at all you have no doubt you already know about Mark and his amazing feats. I had not heard about him until recently (I know I live under a rock) and was amazed, astounded and dumb struck at this particular adventure of his.

I ran across this when I was searching for what to pack for a long bike trek. I came up with the obvious suggestions and the mantra repeated over and over again light lighter and lightest.  All of which made me think of LightLoad Towels (duh)  Anyway I just had to share Mark’s story with you.

This is Mark’s story and a link to his website.

Mark Beaumont’s around-the-world bicycle adventure

The hub for Mark’s expeditions, events, charity work and much more. You can follow Mark’s projects timthumb (2)here and through social media. Broadcasting about adventure, culture, travel, sport, and human endeavor from all corners of the world

What is worse than hearing rats scurrying around your hotel room getting into your bike panniers at night? It might be waking up the next morning with rat turds on the pillow.

That episode in India kind of strips the glamour off the idea of bicycling around the world in pursuit of a world record. It’s just one of many experiences recounted in Mark Beaumont’s book “The Man Who Cycled the World,” recently released in the US.

The Scotsman was the second in what has seemed a rush of bicyclists seeking a Guinness World Record for bicycling around the world.

Beaumont accomplished his feat in 2008, completing his grand adventure in 194 days and 17 hours. Remarkably, he shaved 81 days off the record set by Steve Strange in 2005. At least four others have since tallied faster times on paper, but not all made the record books. The current record holder, Vin Cox, accomplished the feat in 163 days.

Professional adventurer

The Scotsman started his career as a professional adventurer at age 24,when he set off on his 18,296-mile quest. Growing up on a farm and with

timthumbhis university years behind him, Beaumont hit on the idea of the global bicycle ride and figured he could get sponsors if he was going for a coveted world record. He also landed a deal with BBC for a documentary.

Beaumont wrote and published this book, “The Man Who Cycled the World,” the year after he finished his ride. Broadway Paperbacks, an imprint of Crown Publishing, brought the book to US audiences in 2011 and sent me a copy to review.

In reading it, I was struck by how much Beaumont missed by pushing himself to cover 100 miles a day on his bicycle. There are countless times when he talks about being near famous landmarks or destinations, and he just keeps pedaling.

In Thailand, for instance, he catches a tailwind and refuses to stop, in spite of constantly passing road signs for tourist destinations. “The sea was just through the trees to my left and had been for two days, but I hadn’t seen it once.”

No romance

Head-slapping unbelievable is his response to an attractive and “fun” marine biologist he met soon after landing in Australia. As they trade daily texts as he heads across the continent, she offers to take a week off and take a road trip out to his location. At first it seemed perfect, but he writes:

“I called her again that night, having decided against it. It was hard to explain, and it sounded ridiculous even as I tried to, but I needed to be left in my own world.” Later, he thought about changing his mind, “But I knew in the long run I would regret anything that might slow me down. I was here to race.”

So race he does, across four continents. His human contact is often limited to hotel desk clerks, cooks, waitresses and waiters, and whoever is sitting next to him on the stool at the diner.

But people are often drawn to people traveling by bicycle, and he occasionally acquiesces to offers to share their home or meals.

Illness, soreness

Beaumont must have kept a detailed journal, as there are descriptions of the terrain, the local foods, housing, traffic and his condition — all things you expect him to dwell on as he spends hours alone on his bicycle.

Throughout his adventures, Beaumont suffers gastrointestinal attacks, bicycle breakdowns, sore muscles, and various other aches and pains. After riding his bicycle across many countries in all types of weather,
his worst experience comes in Louisiana, where he is hit by a car driven
by an old woman and robbed in his hotel room all in the same day.

Daily centuries

He goes into detail about suffering from saddle sores most of his trip. No wonder, as Beaumont’s target of 100 miles a day takes a toll.

We’ve all ridden centuries, but not day after day after day. Obviously, he doesn’t achieve this goal every day, but he makes the attempt. It often means lots of night riding, camping at the roadside, or riding into strange towns in foreign lands late at night with no idea where to stay.

In the final days of the tour, Beaumont admits to exhaustion as he nears Paris. It’s almost like his goal of riding 100 miles a day has become paramount, and the fact that it enabled him to encircle the globe is just a side issue.

“I still didn’t feel the least bit excited about the finish; I was simply too tired to care. My every thought was focused on making the next mile, knowing that eventually I would get there.”

Beaumont did get there and realized his achievement. But he didn’t stop moving.

More adventures

Soon, he was back on his bicycle to pedal the longest mountain chain on the planet, at the same time climbing Mt. McKinley in Alaska and Aconcagua in Argentina. That adventure also became a book, “The Man Who Cycled the Americas.”

This past summer, he was the member of a crew that rowed to the North Pole. Next, starting in January 2012, he’ll join a team of six seeking to break the trans-Atlantic rowing record.timthumb (1)It sounds like Beaumont isn’t interested in slowing down, at all. I’ll be interested to hear about his next adventures. You can check up on him at MarkBeaumontOnline.

Hiking Lady Reviews Lightload Towels

Carol Roberts The founder of hikinglady.com ,a website devoted to hiking outdoors with neat tips and advice for the novice to the advanced hiker, was kind enough to review the lightload Towels. Below is what she wrote.

LightLoad Towels Review:

http://hikinglady.com/?s=lightload+Towels&submit.x=22&submit.y=12

“I never expected to see a wickable towel that is the size of a silver dollar, extremely durable, absorbent, AND quick drying…but the LightLoad Towels made by Dyna-E are just that. They got in touch with me and asked me to check out their LightLoad (12 x 24 inches/30 x 60 centimeters) towels and the LightLoad Beach Towel (36 x 60 inches) and I was pleasantly surprised. Before I became aware of LightLoad towels, I took either a bandana or a quick dry towel like the MSR face towel on backpacking trips. These towels are a better alternative because they are lighter, smaller (when in the package) and cheaper. Now I’ll be tossing at least one of the LightLoad Towels in my pack, and will keep one in my First Aid kit. They only weigh 0.6oz and take up virtually no space when packaged. LightLoad vs. Paper Towel Absorbency Because of their small size and light weight, I was expecting little more than a rough, flimsy towel that would not absorb anything. In fact, the LightLoads are just the opposite. When I pulled it out of the waterproof packaging, I tried my hardest to tear it, but to no avail. Then I used it to sop up some water, and the towel did the job well and became even softer after I used it. Plus, it was extremely easy to wring out the water. Additionally, the LightLoad Towel is advertised as “The Only Towel That Is A Survival Tool” – since I am not the greatest at starting campfires, I put a match to one of the towels I tested and it lit up immediately! Not surprising because they are 100% vicose, but this is great to have if camping. The only drawback is that it needs to be washed on a delicate cycle or handwashed (my washing machine was too rough for the Lightload Towel), and some other towels on the market can take more washing machine abuse. But given the size and price, I’m a fan of the LightLoad Towels! LightLoads are advertised to have even more uses including: Towel Washcloth Mask Fire Starter Insulation Diaper Wind/Winter Scarf First Aid Supplement Lightload Towels I also tried out the LightLoad Full Size Beach Towel. While I would not take it backpacking because it weights 5oz, it is great for a day at the beach, car camping, or an addition to your home emergency kit. It was a little bit harder to unpack than the small LightLoad Towels, but once I started using it to dry off it worked great.”

New Labeling Hightlights Survival Features of Lightload Towels

  • New Labeling Highlights Survival Features of Lightload TowelsDyna-E International, producers of Lightload Towels (www.ultralighttowels.com) have announced the release of a new packaging design intended to give consumers a better idea of the product’s unique survival features.

    (PRWEB) November 19, 2009 — Dyna-E International, producers of Lightload Towels, have announced the release of a new packaging design intended to give consumers a better idea of the product’s unique survival features. The new label lists several novel uses for the compact, wickable towels that fit easily into a pocket or backpack for anyone who needs to travel light. Features highlighted on the new packaging include the fact that Lightload Towels are wickable and that they are the only towels that are survival tools. They can be used as insulation against cold weather, a mask, and even a diaper.

    “We believe that the new packaging will make it easier for people to understand how versatile the product is,” said George Wheeler, (President of Dyna-E International).

    The hallmark of Lightload Towels has always been their space-saving design, versatility and light weight. According to Wheeler, these are also the first wickable towels on the market. Packaged to fit a 2-inch diameter, the towels open to a full 12” x 24” inch 30x60cm size. They weigh only ½ ounce 18 grams each and are constructed from 100% viscose, a wickable fabric that draws excess moisture from the skin keeping one from freezing in cooler weather. Lightload Towels also come in a larger “beach towel” version.

    While wickable clothing is usually quite expensive, Lightload Towels are not. They are available at a cost of around $2 each, and buyers who purchase 12 towels or more can get a 50% discount using coupon code “50 per.” Now, after years of successful sales in the United States, Lightload Towels can also be purchased in Europe on amazon.de  (Germany) and amazon.co.uk (United Kingdom). More information about this product can be found on the company’s website at ultralighttowels.com. Lightload Towels are also available in stores, online and in catalogues through retailers such as EMS , REI , Campmor

    Contact Information
    GEORGE WHEELER
    Dyna-E International
    http://www.ultralighttowels.com
    917 922 0154

  • WICKABLE LIGHTLOAD TOWELS CHANGE THE WAY PEOPLE TRAVEL AROUND THE GLOBE

    WICKABLE LIGHTLOAD TOWELS CHANGE THE WAY PEOPLE TRAVEL AROUND THE GLOBE Jamaica, New York (November 18, 2009)— Traveling light is a goal for many people, whether they’re going on an extended backpacking trip or a day trip to the mall. With this in mind, Lightload Towels were invented. The hallmark of Lightload Towels is their space-saving design and light weight in addition to the wickable fabric from which they are made. Packaged to fit a 2-inch diameter, the towels are small enough to fit in a pocket and still leave room for other incidentals like keys and a wallet. Lightload Towels open to a full 12” x 24” inch 30x60cm size. They weigh only ½ ounce or 17 grams each and are constructed from 100% viscose, a wickable fabric that draws excess moisture from skin. Wickable fabric is best for keeping warm in cold weather. The towels are an almost indispensable piece of gear for backpackers, campers, fishermen, hikers, bikers or anyone who travels outdoors, and now, after years of successful sales in the United States, Lightload Towels can now be purchased in Europe on amazon.de (Germany) and amazon.co.uk (United Kingdom). Less adventurous travelers will also appreciate the versatility and compact design of Lightload Towels, which can be used in hundreds of imaginative ways. They are useful as fire starters, scarves, insulation, first aid bandages and strainers. They can also be used to protect skin from wind and bugs or any time a traveler needs something to cover the ground to sit on. The towels are more absorbent than cotton, and they dry much faster. A single, machine washable towel can be used over and over again. Lightload Towels are also inexpensive at approximately $2 each. Buyers who purchase 12 towels or more can get a 50% discount using coupon code “50 per.” More information about this product can be found on the company’s website at http://www.ultralightloadtowels.com. Lightload Towels are also available in stores, online and in catalogues through retailers such as EMS, REI, Campmor and Paragon Sports They make excellent stocking stuffers for anyone who can benefit from a lightweight, compact “take-along” towel.

     

    Lightload Towels Bug Repeller Video Demo

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSmteFWTVYU

    Lightload Towels  are the only towels that are survival towels.  View this demo of the lightload Towels as a bug repeller.