Tag Archives: camping products

What to wear for fall hiking a check list

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The following is a clothing checklist for fall hiking. It applies both to children and adults. Once people are experienced with what their bodies require in various weather conditions, we allow individuals to tweak it according to their needs. This list also assumes that you will be spending the entire day outside without the luxury of easily being able to go indoors to warm up. If you are only going out for a couple of hours, you can adjust as necessary.

Head

  • Winter hat – a light fleece beanie works great
  • Balaclava or Buff (optional) – not required if you are bringing a hoodie (see below). We have found Buffs to be highly versatile pieces of clothing and highly recommend them.

Torso

  • Wool/synthetic undershirt – For more info on what we like to use, read our article onunderpants.
  • Wool/synthetic t-shirt
  • Wool/synthetic long-sleeve undershirt
  • Light-weight fleece hoodie (preferred) or fleece sweater
  • Windbreaker – the lighter weight, the better
  • Rain jacket (optional) – whether or not you need this will depend on the forecast. For fall we prefer to bring something waterproof, breathable, and durable. I.e. I wouldn’t recommend a rain poncho.
  • Insulated jacket (optional) – Something light-weight and windproof and preferably with a hood. This jacket is meant to be worn at rest stops. If you have to wear this to stay warm when hiking then you aren’t bringing enough other layers. In early fall or late spring when the temperatures are mild we don’t bother with this. In colder weather this becomes essential.

Hands

  • Wool/Synthetic light-weight gloves or glove liners
  • Mitts (optional) – in early fall or late spring when the temperatures are mild we don’t bother with these.
  • Light weight hand towel for accidents and wipe downs.

Legs

  • Wool/synthetic underwear – as with the undershirts, for more info on what we like to use read our article on underpants.
  • Wool/synthetic long underwear
  • Fleece pants (optional) – some people get cold more easily than others and long underwear isn’t enough.
  • Synthetic hiking pants – make sure they are highly wind resistant and durable.
  • Rain pants (optional) – whether or not you need this will depend on the forecast. As with the jacket, we prefer to bring something waterproof, breathable, and durable.

Feet

  • Wool/synthetic liner socks (optional) – in colder weather, these can add a little extra warmth
  • Wool socks – the warmer the better
  • Waterproof socks (optional) – in cold/wet conditions these are VERY helpful
  • Hiking shoes – we like to wear light-weight trail runners
  • Gaiters (optional) – we will bring these when we think there might be snow and/or ice
  • Crampons (optional) – we will bring these when we think there might be snow and/or ice

If you are going to be hiking in the fall during hunting season, make sure that one of your clothing items is blaze orange. You should also always bring along at least a basic first aid kit.

 First-Aid Checklist

Be prepared! Outdoor enthusiasts should always carry either a prepackaged first-aid kit or a DIY kit created using our comprehensive list as a guide.

Basic Care: Prepackaged first-aid kits available at REI typically contain many of the following items:

A Master Camping Checklist…

From beginners to veterans – a checklist can make the difference between a camping trip that is as fun as you hoped, or one you suffer through.

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Free printable camping checklist. From lists for camping gear and supplies, to food and kids clothes. Happy Campers Camping-Checklis

You should have your camping checklist in hand as you load your camping gear – and turn those checks you made when you gathered your gear into “Xs” that will let you know you actually loaded it – instead of remembering to gather it, and then leaving it on the garage floor when you actually packed to leave.

From the “Master” camping gear checklist for the trip organizer, to a personal gear list the kids can do – these free printer-friendly supplies, and equipment printouts will help ensure nothing gets forgotten.

It can also help you avoid taking gear you don’t need. Why carry a heavy Dutch oven when you will only be using a frying pan? As you scan the list below, don’t get overwhelmed – remember, you will not need everything on it. It is intended to include everything you might need, not everything you have to take.

 

What To Bring: Gear

Packing for an overnight trip requires more gear than a day hike. (Print out a gear list to make sure you pack what you need.) When you’re first starting out, you may want to rent or borrow gear before making such a significant gear investment. Keep in mind, though, that items like backpacks need to fit you well for maximum comfort, meaning borrowed or rented gear might not be as comfortable as gear that’s been fitted to you.

More gear means more weight – a pack loaded with the necessary gear, food and water generally weighs between 30 and 40 pounds for a 2-4 day trip; longer trips require heavier pack loads, but that doesn’t mean your pack has to weigh you down. The key is packing what’s necessary without creating an impossibly heavy pack. Ultralight gear can help, if your budget allows, but sticking to the basics will allow you to backpack comfortably without spending thousands of dollars on new gear. Remember every pound counts!

Clothing

If there’s one rule for clothes in the backcountry, it’s layer, layer, layer. That way you can add or peel off clothing if you feel too cold or too hot. Make sure to avoid cotton: it’s a poor insulator when wet, making you feel colder and increasing your risk of hypothermia. Look for synthetic or wool materials instead.

  • First (base) wicking layer: Tops and bottoms made of wicking material like Polypropylene, Capilene, Thermax, SmartWool or other fabrics help carry moisture away from your body and insulate even if wet.
  • Second (middle) insulating layer: Warm insulator, like a fleece, down jacket or wool sweater (or a combination of these).
  • Third, weather-proof layer: Windproof and waterproof pants and jackets made of water-shedding, preferable “breathable” material, like GoreTex is essential.

Other clothing to bring includes:

  • Hats: Both a sun hat and a warm knit wool or fleece hat for cold nights.
  • Gloves: lightweight in summer, insulated in colder months.
  • Non-cotton t-shirt and long-sleeve shirts; lightweight pants and shorts, or convertible hiking pants.
  • Underwear.
  • Socks and sock liners: Use hiking-specific socks for better cushioning and breathability; thin liner socks help prevent blisters (critical on long hikes!).
  • Boots: Take a look at the article Finding Boots for your Hiking Feet for some tips on what to look for in fit, style, material, etc. And remember, fit is critical, so try on lots of styles! If it’s not comfortable in the store, it certainly won’t be on the trail.

Backpack

You’ll need a backpack that will provide enough space for all your gear without causing you discomfort. In terms of size, you should choose a bag with a volume between 40 and 70 liters (2400 to 4200 cubic inches) for most 2-4 day trips, and a pack of at least 70 liters (4200 cubic inches) for trips 5-days or longer.

For comfort, style is less important than fit. There are two general styles, internal and external frame, and either one can make a perfect backpacking pack. The key is to make sure that 80 percent of the pack weight is carried by your hips. This is ensured by proper fit, particularly with internal frame packs. Get good advice from an experienced outdoor gear retailer and try on many varieties to find one that feels best.

Tent

To find a tent, consider when you’ll be camping, where you’ll generally go and how many people will use the tent. For most backpacking, three-season tents work great. They’re a snap to set up, are great in most weather, and their parts can be split up between your backpacking buddies to reduce weight. Take a look at this page on How to Buy a Tent for tips on purchasing your first tent.

For extra protection, you can opt to bring a ground tarp. Just make sure the it’s two inches shorter than the edges of the tent, since larger ground covers can funnel water to you, leaving both you and your tent soaked.

Sleeping Bag and Pads

Choosing the right sleeping bag and pad can mean the difference between a good night’s sleep and a long, uncomfortable night followed by a tired, miserable day.

Sleeping bags are generally rated with a degree, which indicates the lowest temperature at which the sleeping bag will keep you comfortable (e.g. a “20 degree” bag should keep you warm in temps above 20 degrees). When choosing a bag, keep in mind that even in summer, night temperatures can dip below freeing in the mountains. This means it’s a good idea to choose a “three-season” bag that’s rated between 0 and 15 degrees – it’ll keep you warm even when cold and, if it’s too warm, you can always unzip it slightly to let in cooler air.

Sleeping pads insulate you from the cold and from any rocks or roots on the ground. Many backpackers like Therm-a-Rests or other “self-inflating” pads, but if you’re looking to save weight or money, an inexpensive closed-cell pad can often fit the bill nicely.

The Essentials and First Aid Kit

On top of the big ticket items, there are a few smaller pieces of gear that you should never enter the backcountry without. You’ll find more details here, but for the meantime make sure you always pack these Essentials:

Map and Compass (See above)

First Aid Kit (read here for what you’ll need)

Extra Layers and Rain Gear

Firestarter and matches

Multi-tool or knife

Flashlight or headlamp and extra batteries

Sun screen and sunglasses

Extra food (see below)

Water and a way to purify it (see below)

light weight super absorbent towel (I happen to like the Lightload Camp Towels they are inexpensive and super absorbent)

A note on First Aid:

Before heading into the backcountry, make sure that your First Aid kit is well stocked, and check to make sure nothing’s out of date. It’s also a good idea to take a Wilderness First Aid (or better yet First Responder) course so that you’re prepared in case of emergency. Find out more about that here.

Other Misc. Items

  • Small plastic trowel (for digging “catholes” where you’ll do your business) and toilet paper
  • Biodegradable camping soap, toothpaste and a sturdy hand towel 
  • Duct tape (not required, but useful; wrap it around your water bottle for easy packing)
  • Plastic bags for trash
  • Repair kits for tent, stove, sleeping pad, etc.

What to Bring: Food and Water (and the kitchen!)

Water

It should come as no surprise that water is one of the top Essentials. Backpacking can be hard work, and you’ll need to keep hydrated, especially on hot days. A good rule of thumb is to drink a liter and carry a liter at all times, that way you can be sure to have extra in case of emergency.

Of course, you can’t just drink water straight from the stream. Even the purest looking water can contain pathogens like giardia, which can cause serious illness in the backcountry. Luckily, there are a number of ways to treat water to make it safe for drinking. The simplest and most effective method is simply bringing water to a boil. (No need to wait a certain length of time after it starts boiling- the heating process is enough to kill any pathogens). When you’re not at camp, though, you can use chemical water treatments or filters to make water drinkable.

Food

Eating is pretty important when you’re burning around 5,000 calories a day, if not more. It’s so important, in fact, that we’ve dedicated an entire section to backcountry cooking, including recipes and meal ideas. One thing to think about when shopping for backcountry foods is weight to calorie ratio. Look for lightweight foods, like dehydrated refried beans or hummus mix, rice, and noodles, that will fill you up and give you energy without loading you down. Avoid cans, bottles or bulky packaging that you’ll have to carry out later. If you have the budget for it, pre-packaged dried meals can be a good choice, though certainly not a necessary one, as this article points out.

Freeze Dried Food
Prepackaged meals are easy to prepare, weight little and are quick to clean up. They aren’t cheap, however, and quality varies.

Breakfast options range from the old standby — instant oatmeal — to more creative ideas, like homemade granola, instant soups, toaster pastries, or even pancakes laden with fresh mountain huckleberries. Hot cocoa or Tang can make waking up on a cold morning that much easier.

Lunch is almost always eaten on the trail and usually consists of dense, calorie-rich foods such as bagels, cheese, nuts, salami, trail mix, dried fruit, powdered hummus, jerky, M&Ms, drink mixes (such as powdered Gatorade) and energy bars. Snack throughout the day to keep energy levels higher and to avoid feeling full.

Dinner is probably the most flexible of the meals. Once you make camp, you have plenty of time to prepare more involved recipes, if you so choose, or you can keep it simple with pre-packaged mac-and-cheese (just make sure to bring dehydrated milk) or dehydrated refried beans with instant rice. If you have a sweet-tooth, you can even opt for backcountry desserts.

Cooking Gear

Your backcountry kitchen can be as complex or simple as you choose. The most basic kitchen needs little more than a lightweight backpacking stove and fuel, a pot and pot grip, a large metal spoon (for cooking), and bowls, spoons, or even dutch ovens.

Stoves generally break into two categories: white gas and butane/propane. White gas stoves have a metal fuel bottle you refill with camping gasoline, and these generally burn hotter than canister stoves. You usually need to prime the stove, which adds time to the cooking process.

Canister stoves are simpler to light. Fuel is contained in a sealed cylinder that you toss out when empty. Some downsides include more expensive fuel, and more waste. But canister stoves are extremely lightweight and easy to use. Both options are very lightweight and work quite well for most backpacking trips.

Lightload Towels Are the Answer to Your Camping Needs.

Going camping but don’t know what to bring?  Lightload Towels are the answer to your camping needs.  They pack down to the size of a quarter but unleashed they are large towels. Use them to wash dishes, hold hot pots, mop up spills, filter water, store food,  dry the body and hundreds of other applications .  Reuse them over and over not like paper towels that are done after a wipe. Lightloads also dry quickly and do not allow bacteria buildup like the bulky cotton towels. Lose it on the ground and no worries. Lightloads biodegrade very fast in the environment. They are available in two sizes, the beach towels 36×60 in(90×150 cm) and the smaller 12 x24(30 x60cm)Contact www.ultralighttowels.com

Use lightload Towels to Wash Dishes, Hold Hot Pots, Mop Up spills, Filter Water, Store Food, Dry the Body and Hundreds of other applications .

Going camping but don’t know what to bring?  Lightload Towels are the answer to your camping needs.  They pack down to the size of a quarter but unleashed they are large towels. Use them to wash dishes, hold hot pots, mop up spills, filter water, store food,  dry the body and hundreds of other applications .  Reuse them over and over not like paper towels that are done after a wipe. Lightloads also dry quickly and do not allow bacteria buildup like the bulky cotton towels. Lose it on the ground and no worries. Lightloads biodegrade very fast in the environment. They are available in two sizes, the beach towels 36×60 in(90×150 cm) and the smaller 12 x24(30 x60cm)Contact www.ultralighttowels.com

Free shipping At Wilcor Outdoors for Lightload Towels

change-back-and-forth.gifAsk about the free shipping at Wilcor for the Lightload Towels

Lightload Towels is the most unique product in the Wilcor Outdoors Catalogue. Wilcor is the largest distributor in the camping and vacation industry. Fisherman, rv’s, campgrounds, state parks all use Wilcor products.

Lightload Towels are the lightest most versatile towels around. They can be used for so many things like a shower towels, coffee filters, water filters, first aid supplements  and wind scarves.

Order now at www.wilcor.net or call 800 346 2345

Most Unique Product at Wilcor Outdoors is the Lightload Towels

Lightload TowelsLightload Towels is the most unique product in the Wilcor Outdoors Catalogue. Wilcor is the largest distributor in the camping and vacation industry. Fisherman, rv’s, campgrounds, state parks all use Wilcor products.

Lightload Towels are the lightest most versatile towels around. They can be used for so many things like a shower towels, coffee filters, water filters, first aid supplements  and wind scarves.

Order now at www.wilcor.net or call 800 346 2345

Ulta Light Towels