Tag Archives: survival gear

Mark Beaumont’s around-the-world bicycle adventure

If you are into cycling at all you have no doubt you already know about Mark and his amazing feats. I had not heard about him until recently (I know I live under a rock) and was amazed, astounded and dumb struck at this particular adventure of his.

I ran across this when I was searching for what to pack for a long bike trek. I came up with the obvious suggestions and the mantra repeated over and over again light lighter and lightest.  All of which made me think of LightLoad Towels (duh)  Anyway I just had to share Mark’s story with you.

This is Mark’s story and a link to his website.

Mark Beaumont’s around-the-world bicycle adventure

The hub for Mark’s expeditions, events, charity work and much more. You can follow Mark’s projects timthumb (2)here and through social media. Broadcasting about adventure, culture, travel, sport, and human endeavor from all corners of the world

What is worse than hearing rats scurrying around your hotel room getting into your bike panniers at night? It might be waking up the next morning with rat turds on the pillow.

That episode in India kind of strips the glamour off the idea of bicycling around the world in pursuit of a world record. It’s just one of many experiences recounted in Mark Beaumont’s book “The Man Who Cycled the World,” recently released in the US.

The Scotsman was the second in what has seemed a rush of bicyclists seeking a Guinness World Record for bicycling around the world.

Beaumont accomplished his feat in 2008, completing his grand adventure in 194 days and 17 hours. Remarkably, he shaved 81 days off the record set by Steve Strange in 2005. At least four others have since tallied faster times on paper, but not all made the record books. The current record holder, Vin Cox, accomplished the feat in 163 days.

Professional adventurer

The Scotsman started his career as a professional adventurer at age 24,when he set off on his 18,296-mile quest. Growing up on a farm and with

timthumbhis university years behind him, Beaumont hit on the idea of the global bicycle ride and figured he could get sponsors if he was going for a coveted world record. He also landed a deal with BBC for a documentary.

Beaumont wrote and published this book, “The Man Who Cycled the World,” the year after he finished his ride. Broadway Paperbacks, an imprint of Crown Publishing, brought the book to US audiences in 2011 and sent me a copy to review.

In reading it, I was struck by how much Beaumont missed by pushing himself to cover 100 miles a day on his bicycle. There are countless times when he talks about being near famous landmarks or destinations, and he just keeps pedaling.

In Thailand, for instance, he catches a tailwind and refuses to stop, in spite of constantly passing road signs for tourist destinations. “The sea was just through the trees to my left and had been for two days, but I hadn’t seen it once.”

No romance

Head-slapping unbelievable is his response to an attractive and “fun” marine biologist he met soon after landing in Australia. As they trade daily texts as he heads across the continent, she offers to take a week off and take a road trip out to his location. At first it seemed perfect, but he writes:

“I called her again that night, having decided against it. It was hard to explain, and it sounded ridiculous even as I tried to, but I needed to be left in my own world.” Later, he thought about changing his mind, “But I knew in the long run I would regret anything that might slow me down. I was here to race.”

So race he does, across four continents. His human contact is often limited to hotel desk clerks, cooks, waitresses and waiters, and whoever is sitting next to him on the stool at the diner.

But people are often drawn to people traveling by bicycle, and he occasionally acquiesces to offers to share their home or meals.

Illness, soreness

Beaumont must have kept a detailed journal, as there are descriptions of the terrain, the local foods, housing, traffic and his condition — all things you expect him to dwell on as he spends hours alone on his bicycle.

Throughout his adventures, Beaumont suffers gastrointestinal attacks, bicycle breakdowns, sore muscles, and various other aches and pains. After riding his bicycle across many countries in all types of weather,
his worst experience comes in Louisiana, where he is hit by a car driven
by an old woman and robbed in his hotel room all in the same day.

Daily centuries

He goes into detail about suffering from saddle sores most of his trip. No wonder, as Beaumont’s target of 100 miles a day takes a toll.

We’ve all ridden centuries, but not day after day after day. Obviously, he doesn’t achieve this goal every day, but he makes the attempt. It often means lots of night riding, camping at the roadside, or riding into strange towns in foreign lands late at night with no idea where to stay.

In the final days of the tour, Beaumont admits to exhaustion as he nears Paris. It’s almost like his goal of riding 100 miles a day has become paramount, and the fact that it enabled him to encircle the globe is just a side issue.

“I still didn’t feel the least bit excited about the finish; I was simply too tired to care. My every thought was focused on making the next mile, knowing that eventually I would get there.”

Beaumont did get there and realized his achievement. But he didn’t stop moving.

More adventures

Soon, he was back on his bicycle to pedal the longest mountain chain on the planet, at the same time climbing Mt. McKinley in Alaska and Aconcagua in Argentina. That adventure also became a book, “The Man Who Cycled the Americas.”

This past summer, he was the member of a crew that rowed to the North Pole. Next, starting in January 2012, he’ll join a team of six seeking to break the trans-Atlantic rowing record.timthumb (1)It sounds like Beaumont isn’t interested in slowing down, at all. I’ll be interested to hear about his next adventures. You can check up on him at MarkBeaumontOnline.

Canadian Consumers Ask Campmor about lightload Towels Special Deals

Lightload Towels are a great game piece on rainy days
Lightload Towels are a great game piece on rainy days

Campmor the largest specialty retail mail order house sells the lightload Towels to Canada and have been for quite some time. Ask them about specials that they have. www.campmor.com Campmor has all different types of a outdoor gear like survival tools, travel accessories, hiking gear and camping equipment

Online Stores Ask Liberty Mountain Sports about Lightload Towels specials

Lightload Towels are a great fire starter
Lightload Towels are a great fire starter
The Lightload Towels are the only towels that are survival tools.
The Lightload Towels are the only towels that are survival tools.

Liberty mountain(www.libertymountain.com) The premier specialty sports distributor sells lightload towels out of it’s two warehouses in the East and West. They cover the whole country. They stock major accounts like Eastern Mountain Sports, Sports Chalet and REI. If you are an online store or brick and motor that sells outdoor gear, hiking gear or backpacking equipment. Ask liberty about the Lightload Towels special deals. These are the only towels that are survival tools.

Travel Review: The World’s First Towel to Function as a Survival Tool

Travelwriters.com — Press Release Distribution 6/11/2008
===============================================================— [ FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ] —
THE WORLD’S FIRST TOWEL TO FUNCTION AS A SURVIVAL TOOL
For a sample please contact:
George Wheeler
Dyna-E International
917- 922 -0154
info@lightloadtowels.com

BIODEGRADABLE, POCKET-SIZE TOWEL SAVES LIVES, FILTERS Water, AND KEEPS THE KIDS BUSY THIS SUMMER

July 10, 2008 – (Jamaica, NY) – After thousands of years of “regular” towel use, Lightload Towels presents a towel that functions as a real survival tool. The multi-purpose towel that will fit in your pocket and leave room for keys and pocket change is quickly becoming a must-have item in every outdoorsman’s survival kit as summer approaches.

The eco-friendly, biodegradable towel is essential for any survival kit due to its many uses, which range from functioning as a coffee filter, fire starter, emergency signaling flag, blanket, warming scarf, or as a good old fashioned towel. Unlike the traditional towel, the Lightload Towel absorbs nine times its weight in water and is equivalent in size to two normal-sized towels.

In addition to being the only survival tool of its kind, the Lightload Towels beach towel is a must for every surfer who enjoys a super-absorbent, pocket-sized towel during an active day at the beach. Lightload Towels is the only beach towel that can fit in your pocket with room to spare.

The waterproof packaging can also be used for entertainment purposes during a rainy day indoors, either as a checkers piece or a hockey puck. The towels are reusable, but will not harm the environment once disposed because of their biodegradable material.

About the Founder:

The brain behind Lightload Towels is George “Wideload” Wheeler, an avid long distance hiker who completed the 2160-mile Appalachian Trail in 1999. The year after, he hiked the 540 miles of Virginia to West Virginia on the same trail.

“As an outdoorsman who loves hiking and camping in the wild, I realized the necessity of an easily-portable, space-saving, multi-purpose towel that would be eco-friendly,” said Wheeler. “It’s essential to any first-aid kit and is great to have handy whether you are hunting and fishing or just playing golf.”

Wheeler spent eight years living in Asia, where he took and led hikes in Taiwan, Nepal, Pakistan and China. During this time he also learned how to speak Chinese. Moreover, Wheeler has hiked and camped in many of America’s national forests including the Ochoco and Willamette in Oregon, Davy Crockett in Texas, San Francisco in New Mexico, Piedmont in Alabama, Desoto in Mississippi, Allegheny in Pennsylvania, and the Green Mountain in Vermont.

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Bicycling Around the World? You need…

Scaling Mount Everest to biking across the world, adventure travelers need lightweight multipurpose gear that endures variable conditions. Low and behold Lightload Towels do just that. Tipping the scale at .5 oz and packaged so small that you can put ten 12 x 24 inch towels in your hand with room to spare, Lightload Towels are the quintessential gear. Use them for drying also as a fire starter, wind scarf, first aid supplement, water filter and hundreds of other uses. Known as “a cool tool” Lightloads are great survival gear. They come in two sizes the small 12 x 24 inch(30x60cm) and the Beach size (36x60inch).contact www.ultralighttowels.com

Lightload Towels Versus the Bandanna

change-back-and-forth.gifLightload Towels are

1.more absorbent than bandannas

2. more energy efficient

3. more biodegradable

4. quicker drying

5. easier to carry

6. cleaner out of the package

7. better insulation

8. just as multipurpose but different uses

9. easier to dispose of