Tag Archives: survival tools

What to wear for fall hiking a check list

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The following is a clothing checklist for fall hiking. It applies both to children and adults. Once people are experienced with what their bodies require in various weather conditions, we allow individuals to tweak it according to their needs. This list also assumes that you will be spending the entire day outside without the luxury of easily being able to go indoors to warm up. If you are only going out for a couple of hours, you can adjust as necessary.

Head

  • Winter hat – a light fleece beanie works great
  • Balaclava or Buff (optional) – not required if you are bringing a hoodie (see below). We have found Buffs to be highly versatile pieces of clothing and highly recommend them.

Torso

  • Wool/synthetic undershirt – For more info on what we like to use, read our article onunderpants.
  • Wool/synthetic t-shirt
  • Wool/synthetic long-sleeve undershirt
  • Light-weight fleece hoodie (preferred) or fleece sweater
  • Windbreaker – the lighter weight, the better
  • Rain jacket (optional) – whether or not you need this will depend on the forecast. For fall we prefer to bring something waterproof, breathable, and durable. I.e. I wouldn’t recommend a rain poncho.
  • Insulated jacket (optional) – Something light-weight and windproof and preferably with a hood. This jacket is meant to be worn at rest stops. If you have to wear this to stay warm when hiking then you aren’t bringing enough other layers. In early fall or late spring when the temperatures are mild we don’t bother with this. In colder weather this becomes essential.

Hands

  • Wool/Synthetic light-weight gloves or glove liners
  • Mitts (optional) – in early fall or late spring when the temperatures are mild we don’t bother with these.
  • Light weight hand towel for accidents and wipe downs.

Legs

  • Wool/synthetic underwear – as with the undershirts, for more info on what we like to use read our article on underpants.
  • Wool/synthetic long underwear
  • Fleece pants (optional) – some people get cold more easily than others and long underwear isn’t enough.
  • Synthetic hiking pants – make sure they are highly wind resistant and durable.
  • Rain pants (optional) – whether or not you need this will depend on the forecast. As with the jacket, we prefer to bring something waterproof, breathable, and durable.

Feet

  • Wool/synthetic liner socks (optional) – in colder weather, these can add a little extra warmth
  • Wool socks – the warmer the better
  • Waterproof socks (optional) – in cold/wet conditions these are VERY helpful
  • Hiking shoes – we like to wear light-weight trail runners
  • Gaiters (optional) – we will bring these when we think there might be snow and/or ice
  • Crampons (optional) – we will bring these when we think there might be snow and/or ice

If you are going to be hiking in the fall during hunting season, make sure that one of your clothing items is blaze orange. You should also always bring along at least a basic first aid kit.

 First-Aid Checklist

Be prepared! Outdoor enthusiasts should always carry either a prepackaged first-aid kit or a DIY kit created using our comprehensive list as a guide.

Basic Care: Prepackaged first-aid kits available at REI typically contain many of the following items:

Fun Facts for Hikers

 

What is it about hiking that has us on our feet?Hiker

There are more then few folks who just don’t get it. After all it is an awful lot of work and in the end it’s not like your getting anything from it. Of course I totally disagree, the rewards for all that toil is often a view that can be seen from no where else but the top of that next rise, or a sunset that is beyond beauty. The more tangible benefits are of course an elevated heart rate (in a good way), fresh air and open skies and a chance to explore places not everyone gets to see. Still, not everyone buys into that. So we thought we would look at a bigger picture of hiking, and find the following nuggets of hiking facts, stats, averages, and other numbers:

7,325: Miles. Sum length of the Triple Crown (Appalacian, Pacific Crest and Continental Divide trails combined)

420,880: Feet. Elevation change in the 2,663 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.

46:11:20: Time, days:hours:minutes. Record set by Jennifer Pharr Davis in 2011 for the fastest through-hike of the Appalachian Trail.

5: Pairs. Shoes used up by Davis on her record-setting trek. That’s a new pair every 9 days.

31 million: Americans. According to the American Recreation Foundation this is the number of Americans who hiked a trail in 2007.

4,600: Miles. Longest hike in the U.S., North Country National Scenic Trail. From Lake Sakakawea, North Dakota to Crown Point, New York.

16,368,000: Feet. Length of Continental Divide Trail. That’s 3,100 miles.

734: Miles. Sum of the length of all hiking trails in Glacier National Park.

10: Essentials. As dictated by The Mountaineers, a climber’s organization, in 1930 for establishing what you need to react positively to an accident or emergency, and to spend an unexpected night outside. In order: Map, Compass, Sunglasses and sunscreen, Extra clothing, Headlamp/flashlight, First-aid supplies, Firestarter, Matches, Knife, Extra food.

2003: Year. The Mountaineers updated their 10 Essentials in the 2003 edition of Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills to the following: Navigation (map and compass), Sun protection (sunglasses and sunscreen), Insulation (extra clothing), Illumination (headlamp/flashlight), First-aid supplies, Fire (waterproof matches/lighter/candles), ulta-light towels/blankes, Repair kit and tools, Nutrition (extra food), Hydration (extra water), Emergency shelter

1989: Year. A river guide started a little company that makes sandals. Chaco. You know the one.

10-20: Percentage. Suggested backpack weight for children as a percentage of their body weight. For example, a 50 lbs child should carry backpack that weighs 10 lbs — or until they start whining about numb arms. Which ever comes first. Keep the peace. Try bribery with candy, then move on to reducing weight.

31: Satellites. The Global Positioning System (GPS) operates on a constellation of 31 satellites that orbit the earth on 6 orbital planes at an altitude of 12,600 miles in a fashion that puts nearly all points on the planet in line of sight with at least 6 satellites at any given time.

14,505: Elevation. Mount Whitney is the tallest peak in the 48 U.S., and also the tallest “hikeable” peak (vs climbable) by a trail 22 miles round trip.

6,288: Elevation. Tallest hikeable peak in New England, Mt. Washington.

13: Length. Miles of longest slot canyon, Buckskin Gulch in Utah.

800: Approximated average. Number of hikers who would hike Half Dome on a busy holiday or weekend day in Yosemite before the current permit system went into place. The NPS now allows just 400 people on the trail in a day, and a permit is required.

21: Distance. A rim-to-rim hike of the Grand Canyon using South Kaibab and North Kaibab trails is 21 miles long. A hard 21 miles.

517: Calories. Man weighing 190 lbs will burn this in one hour of hiking.

440: Calories. A woman who weighs 163 lbs will burn this in an hour of hiking.

Canadian Consumers Ask Campmor about lightload Towels Special Deals

Lightload Towels are a great game piece on rainy days
Lightload Towels are a great game piece on rainy days

Campmor the largest specialty retail mail order house sells the lightload Towels to Canada and have been for quite some time. Ask them about specials that they have. www.campmor.com Campmor has all different types of a outdoor gear like survival tools, travel accessories, hiking gear and camping equipment

Travel Review: The World’s First Towel to Function as a Survival Tool

Travelwriters.com — Press Release Distribution 6/11/2008
===============================================================— [ FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ] —
THE WORLD’S FIRST TOWEL TO FUNCTION AS A SURVIVAL TOOL
For a sample please contact:
George Wheeler
Dyna-E International
917- 922 -0154
info@lightloadtowels.com

BIODEGRADABLE, POCKET-SIZE TOWEL SAVES LIVES, FILTERS Water, AND KEEPS THE KIDS BUSY THIS SUMMER

July 10, 2008 – (Jamaica, NY) – After thousands of years of “regular” towel use, Lightload Towels presents a towel that functions as a real survival tool. The multi-purpose towel that will fit in your pocket and leave room for keys and pocket change is quickly becoming a must-have item in every outdoorsman’s survival kit as summer approaches.

The eco-friendly, biodegradable towel is essential for any survival kit due to its many uses, which range from functioning as a coffee filter, fire starter, emergency signaling flag, blanket, warming scarf, or as a good old fashioned towel. Unlike the traditional towel, the Lightload Towel absorbs nine times its weight in water and is equivalent in size to two normal-sized towels.

In addition to being the only survival tool of its kind, the Lightload Towels beach towel is a must for every surfer who enjoys a super-absorbent, pocket-sized towel during an active day at the beach. Lightload Towels is the only beach towel that can fit in your pocket with room to spare.

The waterproof packaging can also be used for entertainment purposes during a rainy day indoors, either as a checkers piece or a hockey puck. The towels are reusable, but will not harm the environment once disposed because of their biodegradable material.

About the Founder:

The brain behind Lightload Towels is George “Wideload” Wheeler, an avid long distance hiker who completed the 2160-mile Appalachian Trail in 1999. The year after, he hiked the 540 miles of Virginia to West Virginia on the same trail.

“As an outdoorsman who loves hiking and camping in the wild, I realized the necessity of an easily-portable, space-saving, multi-purpose towel that would be eco-friendly,” said Wheeler. “It’s essential to any first-aid kit and is great to have handy whether you are hunting and fishing or just playing golf.”

Wheeler spent eight years living in Asia, where he took and led hikes in Taiwan, Nepal, Pakistan and China. During this time he also learned how to speak Chinese. Moreover, Wheeler has hiked and camped in many of America’s national forests including the Ochoco and Willamette in Oregon, Davy Crockett in Texas, San Francisco in New Mexico, Piedmont in Alabama, Desoto in Mississippi, Allegheny in Pennsylvania, and the Green Mountain in Vermont.

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Online Retailer Zpacks.com stocks Lightload Towels

Online Retailer Zpacks.com stocks the lightload Towels. Z Packs www.zpacks.com is a web store specializing in ultralight backpacking gear. Owner Joseph Valesko started the store three years ago and has great success.

Back packing light is good on the body health and great for traveling distances in the least amount of time.  Items like the Lightload Towels aid in lightening up a load. The Lightload Towels are the only towels  in the world that are also survival tools. They weigh a mere .6 oz.

Lightload Towels Versus the Bandanna

change-back-and-forth.gifLightload Towels are

1.more absorbent than bandannas

2. more energy efficient

3. more biodegradable

4. quicker drying

5. easier to carry

6. cleaner out of the package

7. better insulation

8. just as multipurpose but different uses

9. easier to dispose of

Ulta Light Towels